WSJ

Entrepreneur Tyler Haney on her Best Beauty Hacks

The founder of booming athletic-wear company outdoor voices describes her easy, sporty self-care rituals

by: Rebecca Malinsky

Originally published October 5, 2018 in The Wall Street Journal

SPORTY SPICE Tyler Haney photographed at the Outdoor Voices HQ in Austin, Texas. Photo courtesy of WSJ

SPORTY SPICE Tyler Haney photographed at the Outdoor Voices HQ in Austin, Texas. Photo courtesy of WSJ

OUTDOOR VOICES’S founder Tyler Haney calls Barton Springs, a natural pool in Austin, a “fountain of youth.” When she first visited the Texas capital, she went for a dip and had a presentiment that the hippie-haven city would be the ideal home for her budding fitness-apparel company. Two years later, Ms. Haney, 30, has moved all operations to Austin. “Time moves slower here,” she said. “It drives creativity.” Given the city’s outdoorsy nature, it’s also an ideal place for this sporty entrepreneur to test new gear. (Ms. Haney runs 3 miles every day at a “recreational pace.”) 

Her brand of fitness is inclusive. “Not everyone is trying to be Serena Williams,” said Ms. Haney. “We are breaking down the barrier to entry to an active lifestyle.” So rather than overly intense black and neon active wear, the company offers casual pieces in color-blocked combinations like dark blue and green. Just like the clothes, the brand’s motto “doing things” (which can be spotted on its trendy totes and hats from Venice Beach to Vero Beach) spurs its acolytes to get out and enjoy even low-key activities like walking the dog. That accessible approach to fitness carries over to Ms. Haney’s beauty routine.

Clockwise from left: Glossier Boy Brow; Thayers Witch Hazel; Miso soup; Dr. Hauschka Bronzing Tint; Davines shampoo; Davids Toothpaste; ’El Cosmico’ by D.S. & Durga; Four Sigmatic 10 Mushroom Blend. Photos courtesy of WSJ

Clockwise from left: Glossier Boy Brow; Thayers Witch Hazel; Miso soup; Dr. Hauschka Bronzing Tint; Davines shampoo; Davids Toothpaste; ’El Cosmico’ by D.S. & Durga; Four Sigmatic 10 Mushroom Blend. Photos courtesy of WSJ


The first thing I do when I wake up is: take 30 grateful breaths; it sets the tone for the day.

Post-workout I take: a 3-minute cold shower. It’s a challenge, but you’ll feel more alert.

My morning beauty-potion ingredients include: bentonite clay. And I started taking Four Sigmatic’s 10-mushroom blend four months ago for clarity.

My mom says: to consciously smile. It helps lift everything up.

My low-maintenance beauty hack is: Dr. Hauschka’s bronzing tint. I mix it with Embryolisse moisturizer. It adds color in a natural way and just brings me to life in one step.

I’m secretly high-maintenance about: exfoliation. I exfoliate in the shower and then use Nuxe hair, face and body oil which I get in Paris.

My ultimate essential product is: Vintner’s Daughter [face oil]. It smells fantastic and it absorbs into the skin nicely. 

I combat oily skin with: witch hazel. Just the regular stuff from the drugstore. 

My theory on brows is: the more natural the better. Mine are a bit ‘Where the Wild Things Are.’ I use Glossier Boy Brow in clear to keep them in place.

My favorite supposedly beautifying food is: miso soup. I went to Esalen, a spiritual retreat in Big Sur, Calif., and they served it for breakfast which seemed weird at first, but now I love it.

I always carry: D.S. & Durga ‘El Cosmico’ perfume. And CBD oil.

On the plane, I must: brush my teeth with Davids natural toothpaste and put on eye patches by Equal Beauty as soon as I’m allowed to recline the seat.

I wash my hair: every other day with Davines shampoo. But the most important thing you can do for your hair is take Biotin [capsules], something I learned from riding horses growing up. I take BioSil. At Outdoor Voices, when we are casting models we talk about “Biotin girls” meaning girls with vibrant and abundant hair.

—Edited from an interview by Rebecca Malinsky

The Case For Wearing Nightgowns All Day - WSJ

The Bennet sisters and their mother (far right) in white nightgown-esque dresses in the 2005 film version of Jane Austen’s ‘Pride and Prejudice.’ PHOTO: EVERETT COLLECTION c/o The Wall Street Journal

The Bennet sisters and their mother (far right) in white nightgown-esque dresses in the 2005 film version of Jane Austen’s ‘Pride and Prejudice.’ PHOTO: EVERETT COLLECTION c/o The Wall Street Journal

IS THERE A JANE AUSTEN fan out there who hasn’t envisioned an alternate life as Lizzie Bennet from “Pride and Prejudice,” at least the Lizzie in the Keira Knightley movie version? You know, the thoughtful, combative girl who finally gets the guy in a dewy field at dawn while wearing a white nightgown and coat. Such a romantic nightie plays a pivotal supporting role in countless period films, signifying vulnerability, rebellion and great taste in linen. As Jane Eyre in the 2011 adaptation, Mia Wasikowska runs away from Thornfield Hall’s ghost in a dirty, white, ruffle-collared dressing gown; Emily Blunt learns she is to be queen in frilly white sleepwear in “The Young Victoria”; and Kirsten Dunst pretty much reigns as the queen of nightgowns in multiple Sofia Coppola movies. 

Clara Cornet of Galeries Lafayette wears a Simone Rocha nightgown-ish dress in Paris. PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES c/o The Wall Street Journal

Clara Cornet of Galeries Lafayette wears a Simone Rocha nightgown-ish dress in Paris. PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES c/o The Wall Street Journal

You needn’t be an Austen heroine to appreciate the crossover appeal of a gauzy nightgown that does double duty as bedtime fashion and easy weekend dressing. Several ready-to-wear brands of the moment make daytime pieces that recall nightdresses of the past, like London brand Egg’s oversize white shirt dresses, and Danish label Cecilie Bahnsen’s ruffle-trimmed cotton sheaths. And then there are the actual sleepwear labels, like the Sleeper, based in Ukraine, and London’s Three Graces, which tout the appeal of wearing their wares beyond the bedroom. Their high-quality fabrics and sundress-like cuts allow for a seamless night-to-day transitions.

Ms. Dunst’s nightdresses in Ms. Coppola’s film “Marie Antoinette” directly inspired two of the Sleeper’s most recent nightgown designs. Constructed from heavy linen with romantic ruched trim detailing, both are legitimately nice enough to lunch in. Asya Varetsa, co-founder of the Sleeper, said that she wears her own gowns for morning dog walks: “I put on my loafers and I’m ready to go. It’s so easy and convenient.”

Kirsten Dunst and Jamie Dornan in ‘Marie Antoinette.’ PHOTO: ©SONY PICTURES/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION c/o The Wall Street Journal

Kirsten Dunst and Jamie Dornan in ‘Marie Antoinette.’ PHOTO: ©SONY PICTURES/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION c/o The Wall Street Journal

It would be a shame to keep the broderie anglaise detailing and playful prints of these midnight-midday hybrids to yourself. While they can of course be worn to bed, it’s au courant to let them leave the house. “They are light, delicate and airy,” Catherine Johnson, founder of lounge wear brand Three Graces London, explained over email. “It’s totally understandable why some of our clients don’t want to keep them just for the bedroom.”

The Sleeper’s Ms. Varetsa thinks the trend is catching on this summer because of the nightgown’s versatility. “It works on the beach, over your swimsuit,” she said, “but you can easily put on a belt and beautiful sandals and go to dinner in it.” And even though romance revolves more around Tinder and after-work drinks these days than fated encounters in fields, you can channel a bit of Lizzie Bennet’s impetuousness in it, too.

 

SLIP SERVICE // Three beyond-the-sheets nightgowns and the shoes that take them outside

From left: Lounge Dress, $320, the-sleeper.com; Sandals, $310, kjacques.fr; Nightie, $195, thesleepshirt.com; Sneakers, $50, vans.com; Three Graces London Dress, $480, net-a-porter.com; Porselli Flats, $230, usonline.apc.fr PHOTO: F. MARTIN RAMIN/THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, STYLING BY JUDITH TREZZA

From left: Lounge Dress, $320, the-sleeper.com; Sandals, $310, kjacques.fr; Nightie, $195, thesleepshirt.com; Sneakers, $50, vans.com; Three Graces London Dress, $480, net-a-porter.com; Porselli Flats, $230, usonline.apc.fr PHOTO: F. MARTIN RAMIN/THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, STYLING BY JUDITH TREZZA

Moc Something Up - WSJ

FMRV4_Moccasin_Grouping_96.JPG

IF YOU HAVEN’T YET heard the urban legend about the rat that scurried across a sandal-clad woman’s toes in the New York subway, my apologies for ruining your summer. I’ve certainly curtailed my city sandal-wearing since hearing that tale. Thankfully, a more sanitary summer-shoe option—the moccasin—may already be in your closet. If not, the style, currently in vogue, is easily within reach. 

This tanned leather slipper is generally traced back to the Native Americans. Designs varied greatly from tribe to tribe, with elements including porcupine quills and beading, according to Cécile R. Ganteaume, associate curator at the National Museum of the American Indian. Over the past century, the slip-ons have been creatively reinterpreted by stalwarts such as the 72-year-old Minnetonka Moccasin company and luxury brands like Saint Laurent.

“It’s lightweight,” said David Miller, the third-generation CEO of Minnetonka Moccasin. “You can wear it without socks, slip it on, slip it off.” 

This summer, New York-based designer Gabriela Hearst has riffed on the classic, encasing a croc-embossed leather moccasin in colorful crochet that’s too nice for forest traipsing but suitable for lazier vacationing. “They can liven up a serious outfit,” she said of the adaptable shoes, “but also go on holiday.” Tod’s, the Italian accessories brand that has cornered the market on nubby-soled driving mocs, trimmed this season’s version in extra-long fringe, aptly naming it the Yorky. 

“Moccasins work for everything,” said Los Angeles-based stylist Laurie Trott, who, come summer, shuns overly trendy sneakers and overly heavy brogues. Ms. Trott considers them a perfect non-statement statement shoe. “They’re stylish but not wearing you.” 

Subtly fashionable, versatile and excellent at foiling rats—who needs more?

Original story here

Strands That Deliver - WSJ

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal. Necklaces from top: Mikimoto, Tiffany, Louis Vuitton, Sidney Garber. Top, Chanel

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal. Necklaces from top: Mikimoto, Tiffany, Louis Vuitton, Sidney Garber. Top, Chanel

Perhaps you've spotted a woman who hangs heirlooms around her neck just so; or you fondly recall Carrie Bradshaw’s piled-on pearls and chains; or you just like browsing through the thousands of photos hashtagged #layerednecklace on Instagram. Doubling, tripling, even quadrupling up on necklaces has looped back into vogue as an irreverent way to wear jewelry. For the novice, balance is key, as demonstrated in the five approaches shown here. Don’t be afraid to adopt a high-low strategy: Your kids’ crafted beads are fair game, as is that fine jewelry piece you’ve never known quite how to deploy. So next time you leave the house, instead of taking off one piece of jewelry, as mom implored, consider putting another on.

________________________________________

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

The Skeptical Minimalist 

If your taste skews less-is-more, stay within your comfort zone by juxtaposing just two delicate pieces. From top: Kataoka Necklace, $2,980, 180 the Store, 212-226-5506; Beach Stone Necklace, $1,800, cvc-stones.com; Rosetta Getty Dress, $890, Bergdorf Goodman, 212-753-7300

________________________________________

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

The Avid Bohemian

Talismans lend themselves to gypsy excess, so it typically works to pile on meaningful lockets and chain-strung coins with abandon. From top: Eye Necklace, $1,493, litofinejewelry.com; Tassel Necklace, $3,750, Lalaounis, 212-439-9400; Coin Necklace and Chain, $2,200, azleejewelry.com; Horse Coin Pendant, $2,950, templestclair.com; Retrouva Necklace, $8,900, Ylang23, 866-952-6423; Monete Necklace, $20,000, Bulgari, 212-315-9000; Dress, $5,050, louisvuitton.com

________________________________________

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

The Freewheeling Vacationista

If you like to incorporate a beachy aesthetic into your look (even when you’re stuck in the office), go multicolor and mix larger beads with subtler stones. From top: Emerald Necklace, $8,400, Jemma Wynne, 212-980-8500; U-Tube Necklace, $120, roxanneassoulin.com; Turquoise Bead Necklace, $6,490, Irene Neuwirth, 323-285-2000; Bead Necklace, $2,475, Carolina Bucci, 44-207-235-0051; Shirt, $55, everlane.com

________________________________________

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

The Treasure-Hunting Gallerina

Curate your necklace stack as artfully as you approach everything else, by combining playful costume jewelry and more organic materials. Collar Necklace, $1,200, agmesnyc.com; Face Necklace, $165, ninakastens.com; Resin Necklace, $228, toryburch.com; Officine Générale Shirt, $280, saks.com

________________________________________

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

Photo: F. Martin Ramin/The Wall Street Journal

The Doyenne-in-Training

If you’re lucky enough to have classic heirlooms like pearl strands lying around (or some cheeky knockoffs), piling them on fearlessly will help make them look less matronly. From top: Pearl necklace, $16,480, mikimotoamerica.com; Tiffany & Co. HardWear Necklace, $9,500, tiffany.com; Blossom Necklace, $2,610, louisvuitton.com; Diamond Rope Necklace, $215,000, Sidney Garber, 312-944-5225; Vest, $1,500, Chanel, 800-550-0005

Original story here

Revisiting the Allure of Grandma's Matchy-Matchy Outfits - WSJ

Designers like Dolce & Gabbana and Proenza Schouler are proposing coordinated looks that defy the prevailing minimalism of summer fashion

by: Rebecca Malinsky

EACH YEAR post-Memorial Day, the inevitable summer style crisis sets in: What looks fresh when you feel anything but? “I love my Céline blazers,” said Malibu-based designer Lisa Marie Fernandez, “but when it gets hot, it gets hot. And you want to feel nice.” While neutral linen separates are reliable staples and there’s no shortage of underwhelming sundresses, a more surprising summer dressing idea can be found in vintage photos of your grandmother posing in her playsuits on Atlantic City’s boardwalk. 

Brock Collection top and skirt, PHOTO: Andy Ryan for WSJ

Brock Collection top and skirt, PHOTO: Andy Ryan for WSJ

Popularized in the 1940s and ’50s as a matching shorts-and-top set for the beach, with a wraparound skirt for lunch in town, those charmingly retro printed outfits were matchy-matchy precursors to this summer’s explosion of patterned ensembles. 

Whether your taste favors spots or stripes or cherries or pansies, you’ll have your pick of pleasingly coordinated separates. The pieces that pair up to form these outfits are generally sold individually, but Ms. Fernandez—who chose polka dots for her linen button-front tops and skirts this season—said her clients almost always buy a full set. Dolce & Gabbana adorned a cotton mini skirt and crop top in one of its recurring Amalfi ceramic prints, complete with matching headband, shoes and bag for those whose appetite for pattern knows no limits. Proenza Schouler is proposing long floral skirts with matching peplum tops for post-sunset parties. And minimalist line Apiece Apart styled a tank and skirt in colorful stripes together as a full set.

Dolce & Gabbana top, skirt, shoes and headband, PHOTO: Andy Ryan for WSJ

Dolce & Gabbana top, skirt, shoes and headband, PHOTO: Andy Ryan for WSJ

For pragmatists, these two-piece outfits are a no-brainer. Wear the elements together for a low-effort statement look, or expend slightly more styling energy and split them up to achieve (at least) two separate outfits. 

“We are really trying to make it easy,” said Starr Hout, co-founder of Apiece Apart. “Our woman is a mother, a businesswoman, a creative, she is doing things, she is busy like we all are.” The full set takes the thought out of getting dressed; you know the pieces work together. “It’s a one-and-done outfit.” Ms. Hout added.

Beyond that ease, these fun total looks are a nod to the pre-Lululemon days when women reveled in occasion dressing, even for a family day to the beach. “You always feel so much better about yourself when you are dressed up,” said Laura Brock, co-creative director of Brock Collection, a line of ladylike fashion she designs with her husband Kristopher Brock. Ms. Fernandez agreed: “I love dressing up for the warm weather. I don’t even care if I see anyone.”

Lisa Marie Fernandez top and skirt, PHOTO: Andy Ryan for WSJ

Lisa Marie Fernandez top and skirt, PHOTO: Andy Ryan for WSJ

Original story here